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  • Festivals in Singapore

    Mid Autumn Festival Light Up in Chinatown

    Modern Singapore is well-known to be a society where a hybrid of cultures and communities of different faiths and beliefs coexist in harmony. This rich and vibrant multicultural heritage of Singapore is celebrated through her many diverse festivals, spread over the calendar year.

  • Lee Kuan Yew

    Lee Kuan Yew at PAP's meeting at Victoria Memorail Hall

    Lee Kuan Yew is widely regarded as the founder of modern Singapore, serving as the nation’s Prime Minister for 31 years from 1959 to 1990. A well-respected leader in the global community, Lee introduced pioneering policies that transformed Singapore into a modern metropolis.

  • Edmund William Barker

    E W Barker with Devan Nair at a football final in 1983 at the National Stadium

    Edmund William Barker was one of the prominent members of the ‘Old Guard’ that led Singapore from its early days of Independence. For 25 years, he served as the Minister of Law on top of other portfolios that included Home Affairs, National Development, Science and Technology, Labour, and Environment.

  • David Marshall

    David Marshall on a goodwill visit in Jakarta as Chief Minister

    David Saul Marshall was a top-notch criminal lawyer, best remembered for his strong oratorical skills and dedicated service to his country. His passion and talent led him to be elected the first Chief Minister of Singapore and founder of the Worker’s Party in 1957.

  • Bukit Ho Swee Fire

    Bukit Ho Swee Fire displaces 16,000 households

    On 25 May 1961, a massive fire raged through the Bukit Ho Swee estate, destroying schools, shops, factories and attap houses across a 100-acre area. The fire claimed four fatalities and left some 16,000 kampong dwellers homeless. The displacement of families would prove to be a key moment in the development of modern Singapore, paving the way for a massive shift towards the Government’s public housing programme.

  • Black and White Houses in Singapore

    A Black and White Bungalow from the 1900s

    In land-scarce Singapore, the sight of one of the estimated 500 remaining Black and White Houses often conjures up memories of the colonial era in Singapore. Although a majority of these houses were built within a short span of around 25 years between 1903-1928, its uniqueness to the region and unrivalled architecture has made it an invaluable part of Singapore’s history.

  • Benjamin Sheares

    Benjamin Sheares at the 1972 National Day Parade

    Best known to most Singaporeans as the second President of Singapore, Dr. Benjamin Henry Sheares was a well-loved and respected man whose early career in the field of medicine saw him achieve numerous breakthroughs including the internationally recognised technique of the lower Caesarian section.

  • Telok Ayer: Street of Diversity

    View from Mount Walllich

    Telok Ayer Street is one of the oldest roads in Singapore and was once the coastline and the first landing point for migrants who arrived by sea. Today, reclamation projects have pushed the coastline further from Telok Ayer Street, but the place and stories have remained.

  • Yusof Ishak

    Yusof Ishak giving a speech in 1962

    Yusof Ishak is the first President of Singapore. He tided the republic over a period of uncertainty following the separation with Malaysia in 1965. His values and beliefs in meritocracy, multiculturalism and modernisation underpinned Singapore’s success through the nation-building years and left a lasting legacy with the nation.

  • Toh Chin Chye

    Toh Chin Chye pays a visit to the Woodbridge Hospital

    Dr Toh Chin Chye was one of the founding fathers of modern Singapore. He was the co-founder of the People’s Action Party along with Lee Kuan Yew, Goh Keng Swee and S. Rajaratnam, and served as its founding Chairman. Toh was also Singapore’s first Deputy Prime Minister, and was responsible for leading the committee in the design of the Singapore Flag, State Crest, and National Anthem.

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