Intangible Cultural Heritage

Dragon boat

Social Practices, Rituals and Festive Events

47 results found.

  • Pilgrimage to Kusu Island

    kusu island

    Kusu Island is the site of an annual pilgrimage drawing both Chinese and Malay devotees. Meaning “Turtle Island” (龟屿岛) in Chinese and “Peak Island” (Pulau Tembakul) in Malay,

  • Making of Wood-Fired Pottery

    pottery making

    The production of traditional wood-fired pottery using dragon kilns draws on millennia of pottery traditions in China. Dragon kilns, mainly Hokkien and Teochew kilns, were constructed in Singapore in the early 1900s by migrants from South China.

  • Making of Chinese Paper Offerings

    The practice of burning of Chinese paper offerings dates as far back as the Song Dynasty in China. Paper offerings are burnt for the deceased and deities particularly during occasions such as the Hungry Ghost Festival.

    The practice of burning of Chinese paper offerings dates as far back as the Song Dynasty in China. Paper offerings are burnt for the deceased and deities particularly during occasions such as the Hungry Ghost Festival.

  • Nyonya beadwork and embroidery

    Nyonya beadwork and embroidery are intricate craft forms associated with the Peranakan community, and can be found in decorations for everyday household items, as well as more ornamental pieces for special occasions such as weddings.

  • Silver Chariot Procession

    In Singapore, the silver chariot – a huge processional cart carrying an image or idol of the festival’s presiding deity – is towed along a public route for worshippers.

    The Silver Chariot Procession (Tamil: வெள்ளி தேரி ஊர்வலம்) is a religious ritual practiced during Hindu festivals and auspicious consecration ceremonies.

  • Chinese Puppetry

    chinese puppetry

    Chinese puppetry (also known as puppet theatre) is performed in various Chinese dialects, depending on the region it originated from, with sponsors, puppeteers, and audiences congregating based on their native dialect and hometown.

  • Cheongsam tailoring

    Cheongsam tailoring

    The cheongsam, or qipao (旗袍), is an elegant, form-fitting dress that originated in China. Its classic form is characterised by a high cylindrical collar. An opening, traditionally fastened by knotted buttons, runs diagonally to the right from the middle of the collar to the armpit and then down the dress’s side. The garment usually features side slits at the skirt hem as well.

  • Birthing Traditions

    Birthing Traditions

    Birthing traditions involve practices performed during prenatal, labour, and postnatal periods. In various communities, it is believed that prenatal practices can have an impact on the process of labour and delivery. The postnatal period is for a woman to recover from childbirth; hence specific rituals are observed to ensure recovery and prevent ill health in later years. The restoration of maternal health is important and practices are undertaken in the belief that they protect the woman from future illnesses.

  • Making of Traditional Chinese Lanterns

    Making of Traditional Chinese Lanterns

    The making and hanging of Chinese lanterns to celebrate festivals such as the Yuanxiao Festival (元宵节,the 15th day of Chinese New Year) dates back to the Han Dynasty (206BC-220AD) in China.

  • Making of Joss Sticks

    Making of joss sticks

    Joss sticks are fundamental to Chinese rituals and festivals, and often burned as part of rituals conducted during Chinese New Year (including the eve of Chinese New Year), deities’ birthdays, and for religious purposes.

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