'Ting Kong' lantern

This 'Ting Kong' lantern, or ‘Ting Kong teng’ in Hokkein, was hung in front of a temple. Smaller Ting Kong lanterns would have been hung prominently above door plaques in front of the main entrance to a Peranakan Chinese ancestral house. Ting Kong lanterns were used in worship of Ting Kong (天公)—the Heavenly Grandfather—the Chinese folk name of the Jade Emperor. Ting Kong is one of the most important deities worshipped by the Peranakan Chinese. As the reigning deity in the celestial realm of Heaven, Ting Kong was present in many of life’s important rituals, namely the ‘chiu tau’ or coming-of-age ritual. He is the principal witness to the sacred vows that a young man and maiden make before they get married.

Date/Period
Late 19th century
Region
Singapore
Dimension
Object size: H109 x W51.6 x D52.7cm
Accession No.
2005-01564
Material
namwood, lacquer, goldleaf
Collection of
Asian Civilisations Museum
Category
Furnishings

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